Mimivirus: the emerging paradox of quasi-autonomous viruses.

@article{Claverie2010MimivirusTE,
  title={Mimivirus: the emerging paradox of quasi-autonomous viruses.},
  author={Jean-Michel Claverie and Chantal Abergel},
  journal={Trends in genetics : TIG},
  year={2010},
  volume={26 10},
  pages={
          431-7
        }
}
What is a virus? Are viruses alive? Should they be classified among microorganisms? One would expect these simple questions to have been settled a century after the discovery of the first viral disease. For years, modern virology successfully unravelled the huge diversity of viruses in terms of genetic material, replication mechanism, pathogenicity, host infection, and more recently particle structure, planet-wide distribution and ecological significance. Yet, little progress was made in… 
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