Millions "Love Lucy": Commodification and the Lucy Phenomenon

@article{Landay1999MillionsL,
  title={Millions "Love Lucy": Commodification and the Lucy Phenomenon},
  author={Lori Landay},
  journal={NWSA Journal},
  year={1999},
  volume={11},
  pages={25 - 47}
}
The ideology of mass consumer culture is central to all the levels of the Lucy phenomenon: in individual episodes that revolve around commodities, in the "good life" portrayed in the series, in Ball's public persona as "just a housewife," in the myriad of products tied to the series in the fifties (comic books, paper dolls, furniture, clothes), as a syndicated series, and in the nostalgic products popular today. At the core of the phenomenon is a juxtaposition of public and private embodied in… Expand
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