Millet agriculture dispersed from Northeast China to the Russian Far East: Integrating archaeology, genetics, and linguistics

@article{Li2020MilletAD,
  title={Millet agriculture dispersed from Northeast China to the Russian Far East: Integrating archaeology, genetics, and linguistics},
  author={Tao Li and Chao Ning and I. S. Zhushchikhovskaya and Mark J. Hudson and Martine Robbeets},
  journal={Archaeological Research in Asia},
  year={2020},
  volume={22},
  pages={100177}
}
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ANNUAL BIBLIOGRAPHY
Brunson, Katherine, Lele Ren, Xin Zhao, Xiaoling Dong, Hui Wang, Jing Zhou, and Rowan Flad. “Zooarchaeology, Ancient MtDNA, and Radiocarbon Dating Provide New Evidence for the Emergence of Domestic
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