Military service and men's health trajectories in later life.

@article{Wilmoth2010MilitarySA,
  title={Military service and men's health trajectories in later life.},
  author={Janet M. Wilmoth and Andrew S. London and Wendy M. Parker},
  journal={The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences},
  year={2010},
  volume={65 6},
  pages={
          744-55
        }
}
OBJECTIVES This study examines differences in the relationship between veteran status and men's trajectories of health conditions, activities of daily living limitations, and self-rated health. METHODS We use data on 12,631 men drawn from the 1992-2006 waves of the Health and Retirement Study to estimate growth curve models that examine differences in health trajectories between nonveterans and veterans, veterans with and without wartime service, and war service veterans who served during… Expand

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