Mild cognitive impairment after adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients - evaluation of appropriate research design and methodology to measure symptoms

@article{Matsuda2005MildCI,
  title={Mild cognitive impairment after adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients - evaluation of appropriate research design and methodology to measure symptoms},
  author={Tomohiro Matsuda and Tomoko Takayama and Manabu Tashiro and Yu Nakamura and Yasuo Ohashi and Kojiro Shimozuma},
  journal={Breast Cancer},
  year={2005},
  volume={12},
  pages={279-287}
}
The development of new chemotherapeutic agents and regimens has contributed to reduced risk of cancer recurrence and prolonged patient survival. However, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), also known as “chemofog” or “chemobrain” following adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer has been reported since the late 1980s. Unfortunately, little is known about it's mechanism, type, severity, and episode length. This article reviewed related studies on the subject, and found that chemotherapy-induced… 
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Findings suggest that breast cancer patients who undergo chemotherapy may experience mild cognitive decline, and further study is needed to generate knowledge and guideline for interventions to address chemotherapy related cognitive impairment in these patients.
[Prevalence and characteristics of chemotherapy-related cognitive impairment in patients with breast cancer].
PURPOSE Evidence suggests that some patients with breast cancer experience cognitive difficulties following chemotherapy. This longitudinal study was done to examine the prevalence of cognitive
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The results seem to rule out any significant cognitive impairment due to adjuvant FOLFOX4 chemotherapy in colon cancer patients, and may be explained by the central role of the psychological adaptation process.
Cognitive function in breast cancer survivors.
  • J. Vardy
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Cancer treatment and research
  • 2009
TLDR
Cognitive studies in cancer patients who have received chemotherapy are inconsistent in describing the types of neuropsychological dysfunction found, although commonly affected cognitive domains are attention/concentration, verbal and visual memory, and processing speed.
Chemotherapy-related cognitive impairment: does integrating complementary medicine have something to add? Review of the literature
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This work reviews current knowledge regarding the etiology of chemotherapy-related cognitive impairment, risk factors, conventional therapy, coping strategies, and potential complementary and integrative medicine treatments and recommends conducting further research on the potential role of complementary and Integrative medicine modalities in the treatment and prevention of chemotherapy’s cognitive impairment.
Challenges and limitations of neurocognitive studies in cancer patients
TLDR
Findings support the existence of the “chemobrain” phenomenon beyond the patients’ subjective reports and call for further research of high methodological quality to delineate the temporal and spatial pattern of chemotherapyassociated central nervous system (CNS) toxicity.
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