Migration and schizophrenia

@article{Selten2007MigrationAS,
  title={Migration and schizophrenia},
  author={Jean-Paul Selten and Elizabeth Cantor-Graae and Ren{\'e} S. Kahn},
  journal={Current Opinion in Psychiatry},
  year={2007},
  volume={20},
  pages={111–115}
}
Purpose of review An exploration of the evidence that a history of migration is a risk factor for schizophrenia and an evaluation of those studies that seek an explanation for this. Recent findings A meta-analysis found an increased risk for schizophrenia among first-generation and second-generation migrants and found a particularly high risk for migrants from countries where the majority of the population was Black. The latter finding was confirmed and extended by a large first-contact… Expand
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