Migration Waves to the Baltic Sea Region

@article{Lappalainen2008MigrationWT,
  title={Migration Waves to the Baltic Sea Region},
  author={Tuuli Lappalainen and V Laitinen and Elina Salmela and Peter M. Andersen and Kirsi Huoponen and M-L. Savontaus and P{\"a}ivi Lahermo},
  journal={Annals of Human Genetics},
  year={2008},
  volume={72}
}
In this study, the population history of the Baltic Sea region, known to be affected by a variety of migrations and genetic barriers, was analyzed using both mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosomal data. [] Key Method Over 1200 samples from Finland, Sweden, Karelia, Estonia, Setoland, Latvia and Lithuania were genotyped for 18 Y-chromosomal biallelic polymorphisms and 9 STRs, in addition to analyzing 17 coding region polymorphisms and the HVS1 region from the mtDNA. It was shown that the populations surrounding…
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