Might Flowers of Invasive Plants Increase Native Bee Carrying Capacity? Intimations From Capitol Reef National Park, Utah

@inproceedings{Tepedino2008MightFO,
  title={Might Flowers of Invasive Plants Increase Native Bee Carrying Capacity? Intimations From Capitol Reef National Park, Utah},
  author={V. Tepedino and Brosi A. Bradley and T. Griswold},
  year={2008}
}
Abstract We compared the native bees visiting the flowers of three species of invasive plants, saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) and white and yellow sweet clover (Melilotus albus, M. officinalis), with those visiting seven concurrently blooming native plant species in mid-summer at three sites in Capitol Reef National Park, Utah. Overall, as many total species of bees visited the flowers of the three invasive plant species as visited the seven natives. On average, invasive species were visited by twice… Expand
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