Midgut lysozymes of Lucilia sericata – new antimicrobials involved in maggot debridement therapy

@article{Valachov2014MidgutLO,
  title={Midgut lysozymes of Lucilia sericata – new antimicrobials involved in maggot debridement therapy},
  author={Ivana Valachov{\'a} and Peter Tak{\'a}{\vc} and Juraj Majt{\'a}n},
  journal={Insect Molecular Biology},
  year={2014},
  volume={23}
}
Larvae of Lucilia sericata are used for maggot debridement therapy (MDT) because of their ability to remove necrotic tissue and eradicate bacterial pathogens of infected wounds. So far, very few antibacterial factors have been fully characterized (eg lucifensin). Using a molecular approach, some other putative antimicrobial compounds, including three novel lysozymes, have been previously identified and predicted to be involved in MDT. Nevertheless, data on lysozymes tissue origin and their… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
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