Middle Stone Age Bedding Construction and Settlement Patterns at Sibudu, South Africa

@article{Wadley2011MiddleSA,
  title={Middle Stone Age Bedding Construction and Settlement Patterns at Sibudu, South Africa},
  author={Lyn Wadley and Christine Sievers and Marion K. Bamford and Paul Goldberg and Francesco Berna and Christopher E. Miller},
  journal={Science},
  year={2011},
  volume={334},
  pages={1388 - 1391}
}
Early humans constructed sleeping mats from local plants, including some with insecticidal properties. The Middle Stone Age (MSA) is associated with early behavioral innovations, expansions of modern humans within and out of Africa, and occasional population bottlenecks. Several innovations in the MSA are seen in an archaeological sequence in the rock shelter Sibudu (South Africa). At ~77,000 years ago, people constructed plant bedding from sedges and other monocotyledons topped with aromatic… 

Fire and grass-bedding construction 200 thousand years ago at Border Cave, South Africa

TLDR
The authors speculate that the ash may have been deliberately used in bedding to inhibit the movement of ticks and other arthropod irritants, extending the record of deliberate construction of plant bedding by at least 100,000 years.

A charcoal study from the Middle Stone Age, 77,000 to 65,000 years ago, at Sibudu, KwaZulu-Natal

  • S. LennoxL. Wadley
  • Environmental Science
    Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa
  • 2019
New charcoal identifications are reported from the archaeological site, Sibudu Cave, KwaZulu-Natal. From six layers dated 77,000 to 65,000 years ago, 617/769 specimens were identified to 54 different

Phytoliths as an indicator of early modern humans plant gathering strategies, fire fuel and site occupation intensity during the Middle Stone Age at Pinnacle Point 5-6 (south coast, South Africa)

TLDR
This study reports the first evidence of the intentional gathering and introduction into living areas of plants from the Restionaceae family by MSA hunter-gatherers inhabiting the south coast of South Africa.

The place beyond the trees: renewed excavations of the Middle Stone Age deposits at Olieboomspoort in the Waterberg Mountains of the South African Savanna Biome

Olieboomspoort is one of the few rock shelters in the vast interior of southern Africa documenting pulses of occupation from the Acheulean until the end of the Later Stone Age. Revil Mason excavated

Macrobotanical Remains from Wonderwerk Cave (Excavation 1), Oldowan to Late Pleistocene (2 Ma to 14 ka bp), South Africa

Wonderwerk Cave in the Northern Cape Province of South Africa has a record of occupation spanning some 2 million years, comprising flora, fauna and cultural artifacts and, therefore, potentially, has

Those marvellous millennia: the Middle Stone Age of Southern Africa

  • L. Wadley
  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • 2015
Africa's Middle Stone Age (MSA) may have lasted almost half a million years, but its earliest expression is not yet well understood. The MSA is best known for innovations that appear in the

Past environmental proxies from the Middle Stone Age at Sibudu, Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa

Middle Stone Age technological and behavioural developments in southern Africa are central to understanding the emergence of modern humans, and elucidating the role of environmental change in this

The Taphonomy of the Final Middle Stone Age Fauna from Sibudu Cave, South Africa

This study applies a taphonomic analysis to the final Middle Stone Age faunal assemblage from Sibudu Cave, South Africa, by assessing bone surface modifications, breakage patterns and skeletal

The Taphonomy of the Final Middle Stone Age Fauna from Sibudu Cave, South Africa

This study applies a taphonomic analysis to the final Middle Stone Age faunal assemblage from Sibudu Cave, South Africa, by assessing bone surface modifications, breakage patterns and skeletal

Stone Age landscape use in the Olifants River Valley, Clanwilliam, Western Cape, South Africa

ABSTRACT Stone Age surface assemblages are all too often neglected in favour of stratified, datable cave sequences, thus overlooking important insights into changing behavioural patterns at a broader
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 30 REFERENCES

Bedding, hearths, and site maintenance in the Middle Stone Age of Sibudu Cave, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Micromorphological analysis of sediments from the Middle Stone Age site of Sibudu Cave, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, provides a high-resolution sequence and evidence of site formation processes of

Stone Age hut in Israel yields world's oldest evidence of bedding.

TLDR
The earliest in situ bedding exposed on a brush hut floor is reported, found at the previously submerged, excellently preserved 23,000-year-old fisher-hunter-gatherers' camp of Ohalo II, situated in Israel on the shore of the Sea of Galilee.

Ages for the Middle Stone Age of Southern Africa: Implications for Human Behavior and Dispersal

TLDR
Age ages for nine sites from varied climatic and ecological zones across southern Africa show that both industries were short-lived (5000 years or less), separated by about 7000 years, and coeval with genetic estimates of population expansion and exit times.

Early Use of Pressure Flaking on Lithic Artifacts at Blombos Cave, South Africa

TLDR
Replication experiments show that pressure flaking best explains the morphology of lithic artifacts recovered from the ~75-ka Middle Stone Age levels at Blombos Cave, South Africa.

Pit Structure Abandonment in the Four Corners Region of the American Southwest: Late Basketmaker III and Pueblo I Periods

Abstract Anasazi pit structures dating to the Basketmaker III and Pueblo I periods (ca. A.C. 500 to 900) in the Four Corners region of the American Southwest experienced a variety of different

Emergence of Modern Human Behavior: Middle Stone Age Engravings from South Africa

TLDR
Two abstract representations engraved on pieces of red ochre recovered from the Middle Stone Age layers at Blombos Cave in South Africa support the emergence of modern human behavior in Africa at least 35,000 years before the start of the Upper Paleolithic.

The prehistoric flint mines at Jhimpir in Lower Sindh (Pakistan)

Until recently the only prehistoric flint mining area in Sindh to be exploited during the Indus civilisation was thought to be the Rohri Hills (Allchin 1979; Starnini & Biagi 2006; Biagi & Starnini