Mid-Holocene vertebrate bone Concentration-Lagerstatte on oceanic island Mauritius provides a window into the ecosystem of the dodo (Raphus cucullatus)

@article{Rijsdijk2009MidHoloceneVB,
  title={Mid-Holocene vertebrate bone Concentration-Lagerstatte on oceanic island Mauritius provides a window into the ecosystem of the dodo (Raphus cucullatus)},
  author={Kenneth F. Rijsdijk and Julian P. Hume and FRANS P. M. Bunnik and François Benjamin Vincent Florens and Cl{\'a}udia Baider and Beth Shapiro and Johannes van der Plicht and Anwar Janoo and Owen L. Griffiths and Lars W. van den Hoek Ostende and Holger Cremer and Tamara J. J. Vernimmen and Perry G. B. de Louw and A. Bholah and Salem Saumtally and Nicolas Porch and James Haile and Michael Buckley and Matthew James Collins and Edmund Gittenberger},
  journal={Quaternary Science Reviews},
  year={2009},
  volume={28},
  pages={14-24}
}

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