Microvascular anastomosis using a photochemical tissue bonding technique

@article{ONeill2007MicrovascularAU,
  title={Microvascular anastomosis using a photochemical tissue bonding technique},
  author={Anne C O'Neill and Jonathan M. Winograd and Jos{\'e} Luis Zeballos and Timothy S. Johnson and Mark A. Randolph and Kenneth E Bujold and Irene E Kochevar and Robert W. Redmond},
  journal={Lasers in Surgery and Medicine},
  year={2007},
  volume={39}
}
Photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) combines photoactive dyes with visible light to create fluid‐tight seals between tissue surfaces without causing collateral thermal damage. The potential of PTB to improve outcomes over standard of care microsurgical reanastomoses of blood vessels in ex vivo and in vivo models was evaluated. 
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