Microsporidia: biology and evolution of highly reduced intracellular parasites.

@article{Keeling2002MicrosporidiaBA,
  title={Microsporidia: biology and evolution of highly reduced intracellular parasites.},
  author={P. Keeling and N. Fast},
  journal={Annual review of microbiology},
  year={2002},
  volume={56},
  pages={
          93-116
        }
}
  • P. Keeling, N. Fast
  • Published 2002
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Annual review of microbiology
  • Microsporidia are a large group of microbial eukaryotes composed exclusively of obligate intracellular parasites of other eukaryotes. Almost 150 years of microsporidian research has led to a basic understanding of many aspects of microsporidian biology, especially their unique and highly specialized mode of infection, where the parasite enters its host through a projectile tube that is expelled at high velocity. Molecular biology and genomic studies on microsporidia have also drawn attention to… CONTINUE READING

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