Microsatellite analysis of kinkajou social organization

@article{Kays2000MicrosatelliteAO,
  title={Microsatellite analysis of kinkajou social organization},
  author={Roland Kays and John L. Gittleman and Robert K. Wayne},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2000},
  volume={9}
}
Kinkajou social groups generally consist of one adult female, two males, one subadult and one juvenile. Based on analysis of variation in 11 microsatellite loci, we assess the degree of kinship within and between four social groups totaling 25 kinkajous. We use exclusion and likelihood analyses to assign parents for seven of the eight offspring sampled, five with ≥ 95% certainty, and two with ≥ 80% certainty. Five of six identified sires of group offspring came from the same social group as the… Expand

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