Microorganisms associated with chromosome destruction and reproductive isolation between two insect species

@article{Breeuwer1990MicroorganismsAW,
  title={Microorganisms associated with chromosome destruction and reproductive isolation between two insect species},
  author={Johannes A. J. Breeuwer and John H. Werren},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1990},
  volume={346},
  pages={558-560}
}
MICROORGANISMS have been implicated in causing cytoplasmic incompatibility in a variety of insect species, including mosquitoes, fruitflies, beetles and wasps1–17. The effect is typically unidirectional: incompatible crosses produce no progeny1–11 or sterile males12–14, whereas the reciprocal crosses produce normal progeny. The parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis is one of the few species in which the cytogenetic mechanism of incompatibility is known. In this species the paternal chromosome set… Expand
Effect of genotype on cytoplasmic incompatibility between two species of Nasonia
TLDR
Elimination of the cytoplasmically-inherited bacteria by antibiotic treatments restores compatibility, i.e. hybrid females are produced in interspecific crosses and indicates that compatibility type is independent of the host genotype and is based on differences between cy toplasmic bacteria of the two Nasonia species. Expand
Molecular identification of microorganisms associated with parthenogenesis
TLDR
It is concluded that parthenogenesis bacteria and cytoplasmic incompatibility bacteria form a monophyletic group of microorganisms that 'specialize' in manipulating chromosome behaviour and reproduction of insects. Expand
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HYBRID BREAKDOWN BETWEEN TWO HAPLODIPLOID SPECIES: THE ROLE OF NUCLEAR AND CYTOPLASMIC GENES
TLDR
Experiments clearly demonstrate that the latter incompatibility is not due to maternal‐effect genes, but to cytoplasmically inherited elements, supporting the view that hybrid lethality genes tend to be recessive. Expand
HYBRID BREAKDOWN BETWEEN TWO HAPLODIPLOID SPECIES: THE ROLE OF NUCLEAR AND CYTOPLASMIC GENES.
TLDR
Experiments clearly demonstrate that the latter incompatibility is not due to maternal-effect genes, but to cytoplasmically inherited elements, supporting the view that hybrid lethality genes tend to be recessive. Expand
Cytoplasmic incompatibility and bacterial density in Nasonia vitripennis.
TLDR
Experiments show that bacterial density is correlated with compatibility differences between male and female Nasonia, and this result is consistent with a critical "imprinting" period during egg maturation, when cytoplasmic bacteria determine compatibility. Expand
ROLE OF NUCLEAR AND CYTOPLASMIC GENES
TLDR
Experiments clearly demonstrate that the latter incompatibility is not due to maternal-effect genes, but to cytoplasmically inherited elements, supporting the view that hybrid lethality genes tend to be recessive. Expand
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TLDR
It is found that Wolbachia infection negatively affected Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans in homospecific crosses, but does not appear to cause reproductive isolation between these two species. Expand
The Biochemistry of Cytoplasmic Incompatibility Caused by Endosymbiotic Bacteria
TLDR
With the identity of the Wolbachia CI induction and rescue factors now known, research in the field has turned to directed studies on the molecular mechanisms of CI, which are reviewed here. Expand
Multiple infections and diversity of cytoplasmic incompatibility in a haplodiploid species
TLDR
Comparing CI effects in crosses involving insect lines sharing the same nuclear background, but harboring different mixtures of strains suggests that the CI of FM type results from a stronger effect than the MD type, which conflicts with the conventional hypotheses used to explain CI diversity in haplodiploids. Expand
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