Microhabitat use in the amblypygid Paraphrynus laevifrons

@article{Corey2017MicrohabitatUI,
  title={Microhabitat use in the amblypygid Paraphrynus laevifrons},
  author={Tyler B. Corey and Eileen A Hebets},
  journal={Journal of Arachnology},
  year={2017},
  volume={45},
  pages={223 - 230}
}
Abstract Amblypygids (Order: Amblypygi) can be found across different habitat types, each with very different microhabitat structure, including rainforests, deserts, and caves in the tropics and subtropics. Most prior studies on amblypygid microhabitat use have focused on characteristics of trees and their relationship with amblypygid abundance, though many species regularly occupy refuges away from trees. Here we explore microhabitat use in the amblypygid Paraphrynus laevifrons Pocock, 1894… Expand
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lobal patterns of sexual dimorphism in Amblypygi
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