Microbial view of central nervous system autoimmunity

@article{Berer2014MicrobialVO,
  title={Microbial view of central nervous system autoimmunity},
  author={Kerstin Berer and Gurumoorthy Krishnamoorthy},
  journal={FEBS Letters},
  year={2014},
  volume={588}
}
The Gut–CNS Axis in Multiple Sclerosis
Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells in Multiple Sclerosis: The Jury is Still Out
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The current knowledge on MAIT cell biology in health and disease is described, the possible mechanisms behind their role in MS are discussed, and the specific features of this new non-conventional T cell subset make it an interesting candidate as a biomarker or as the target of immune-mediated intervention.
Multiple Sclerosis and T Lymphocytes: An Entangled Story
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The migration of activated T lymphocytes from the periphery into the CNS has been identified as a crucial step in the formation of MS lesions and several factors promote such T cell extravasation including: molecules implicated in the T cell-blood brain barrier interaction, and chemokines produced by neural cells.
Environmental Factors and Their Regulation of Immunity in Multiple Sclerosis
[Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System: Problem Statement and Prospects].
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The scientists of the biggest Russian neurological centre, Research Centre of Neurology (Moscow), developed a <<vaccine>> for immunotherapy of multiple sclerosis, studied pathomorphosis of Guillain-Barre syndrome, specified the components of its pathogenesis and improved the programs of pathogenetic therapy.
Corrigendum to ‘Multiple sclerosis: New insights and trends’
Does the Gut Microbiota Influence Immunity and Inflammation in Multiple Sclerosis Pathophysiology?
TLDR
EAE, as an animal model of MS, indicates a strong influence of the gut microbiota on the immune system and shows that disturbances in gut physiology may contribute to the development of MS.
T cell responses in the central nervous system
TLDR
The main mechanisms that are involved in the priming and CNS recruitment of CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cell and regulatory T cells are highlighted and the plasticity of T cell responses in the CNS is considered, with a focus on viral infection and autoimmunity.
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