Microbial fossil record of rocks from the Ross Desert, Antarctica: implications in the search for past life on Mars

@article{Wierzchos2002MicrobialFR,
  title={Microbial fossil record of rocks from the Ross Desert, Antarctica: implications in the search for past life on Mars},
  author={J. Wierzchos and C. Ascaso},
  journal={International Journal of Astrobiology},
  year={2002},
  volume={1},
  pages={51 - 59}
}
Cryptoendolithic microbial communities living within Antarctic rocks are an example of survival in an extremely cold and dry environment. The extinction of these micro-organisms formerly colonizing sandstone in the Mount Fleming area (Ross Desert), was probably provoked by the hostile environment. This is considered to be a good terrestrial analogue of the first stage of the disappearance of possible life on early Mars. To date, only macroscopically observed indirect biomarkers of the past… Expand
Biomineralization of endolithic microbes in rocks from the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica: implications for microbial fossil formation and their detection.
TLDR
It is proposed that the microbial fossil formation observed was induced by mineral precipitation resulting from inorganic processes occurring after the death of cryptoendolithic microorganisms. Expand
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[1] The cryptoendolithic habitat of the Antarctic Dry Valleys has been considered a good analogy for past Martian ecosystems, if life arose on the planet. Yet cryptoendoliths are thought to favor theExpand
Identifying elements in rocks from the Dry Valleys desert (Antarctica) by ion beam proton induced X-ray emission
In some zones of Antarctica’s cold and dry desert, the extinction of cryptoendolithic microorganisms leaves behind inorganic traces of microbial life. The extinction of these microorganisms isExpand
New approaches to the study of Antarctic lithobiontic microorganisms and their inorganic traces, and their application in the detection of life in Martian rocks
  • C. Ascaso, J. Wierzchos
  • Biology, Medicine
  • International microbiology : the official journal of the Spanish Society for Microbiology
  • 2002
TLDR
The detection of chains of magnetite within the Martian meteorite ALH84001 is described, as an example of the potential use of SEM-BSE in the search for plausible traces of life on early Mars. Expand
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TLDR
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Alteration of rocks by endolithic organisms is one of the pathways for the beginning of soils on Earth
TLDR
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Abstract The microstructure of HF-etched samples of Early Archaean banded iron formations (BIFs) and cherts from the >3.7 b.y.-old Isua Greenstone Belt (southwestern Greenland) was investigated usingExpand
Viability of endolithic micro‐organisms in rocks from the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica established by confocal and fluorescence microscopy
TLDR
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