Microbial carbonates: the geological record of calcified bacterial–algal mats and biofilms

@article{Riding2000MicrobialCT,
  title={Microbial carbonates: the geological record of calcified bacterial–algal mats and biofilms},
  author={Robert Riding},
  journal={Sedimentology},
  year={2000},
  volume={47}
}
  • R. Riding
  • Published 1 February 2000
  • Environmental Science
  • Sedimentology
Deposits produced by microbial growth and metabolism have been important components of carbonate sediments since the Archaean. Geologically best known in seas and lakes, microbial carbonates are also important at the present day in fluviatile, spring, cave and soil environments. The principal organisms involved are bacteria, particularly cyanobacteria, small algae and fungi, that participate in the growth of microbial biofilms and mats. Grain‐trapping is locally important, but the key process… 

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