Microbial Ecology of Dental Plaque and its Significance in Health and Disease

@article{Marsh1994MicrobialEO,
  title={Microbial Ecology of Dental Plaque and its Significance in Health and Disease},
  author={Philip D. Marsh},
  journal={Advances in Dental Research},
  year={1994},
  volume={8},
  pages={263 - 271}
}
  • P. Marsh
  • Published 1 July 1994
  • Biology
  • Advances in Dental Research
Dental plaque forms naturally on teeth and is of benefit to the host by helping to prevent colonization by exogenous species. The bacterial composition of plaque remains relatively stable despite regular exposure to minor environmental perturbations. This stability (microbial homeostasis) is due in part to a dynamic balance of both synergistic and antagonistic microbial interactions. However, homeostasis can break down, leading to shifts in the balance of the microflora, thereby predisposing… 

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