Microbes and microbial toxins: paradigms for microbial-mucosal interactions. VIII. Pathological consequences of rotavirus infection and its enterotoxin.

@article{Morris2001MicrobesAM,
  title={Microbes and microbial toxins: paradigms for microbial-mucosal interactions. VIII. Pathological consequences of rotavirus infection and its enterotoxin.},
  author={Andrew P. Morris and Mary K. Estes},
  journal={American journal of physiology. Gastrointestinal and liver physiology},
  year={2001},
  volume={281 2},
  pages={G303-10}
}
Rotaviral infection in neonatal animals and young children leads to acute self-limiting diarrhea, but infected adults are mainly asymptomatic. Recently, significant in-roads have been made into our understanding of this disease: both viral infection and virally manufactured nonstructural protein (NSP)4 evoke intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) mobilization in native and transformed gastrointestinal epithelial cells. In neonatal mouse pup mucosa models, [Ca(2+)]i elevation leads to age-dependent… CONTINUE READING