Micro‐Phylogeographic and Demographic History of Portuguese Male Lineages

@article{Beleza2006MicroPhylogeographicAD,
  title={Micro‐Phylogeographic and Demographic History of Portuguese Male Lineages},
  author={Sandra Beleza and Leonor Gusm{\~a}o and Alexandra M. Lopes and Cíntia Alves and Iva Gomes and Maria Giouzeli and Francesc Calafell and {\'A}ngel Carracedo and Ant{\'o}nio Amorim},
  journal={Annals of Human Genetics},
  year={2006},
  volume={70}
}
The clinal pattern observed for the distribution of Y‐chromosome lineages in Europe is not always reflected at a geographically smaller scale. Six hundred and sixty‐three male samples from the 18 administrative districts of Portugal were typed for 25 Y‐chromosome biallelic and 15 microsatellite markers, in order to assess the degree of substructuring of male lineage distribution. Haplogroup frequency distributions, Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA) and genetic distance analyses at both Y… 
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