Methylphenidate for the Treatment of Apathy in Alzheimer Disease: Prediction of Response Using Dextroamphetamine Challenge

@article{Herrmann2008MethylphenidateFT,
  title={Methylphenidate for the Treatment of Apathy in Alzheimer Disease: Prediction of Response Using Dextroamphetamine Challenge},
  author={Nathan Herrmann and Lana S. Rothenburg and Sandra E. Black and Michelle Ryan and Barbara A. Liu and Usoa E. Busto and Krista L. Lanct{\^o}t},
  journal={Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology},
  year={2008},
  volume={28},
  pages={296-301}
}
Apathy is a common behavioral symptom of Alzheimer's disease (AD), being present in up to 70% of patients. Apathy in AD and non-AD populations has been associated with dysfunction in the dopaminergic brain reward system, suggesting that pharmacotherapeutic targeting of this system may be an effective treatment for apathy in AD. We therefore performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial of methylphenidate in a sample of 13 apathetic AD patients (6 men, 7 women; age… Expand
The Apathy in Dementia Methylphenidate Trial 2 (ADMET 2): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial
TLDR
With a larger sample size and longer follow up, ADMET 2 is poised to confirm or refute the original ADMET findings, which found that treatment of apathy in AD with methylphenidate was associated with significant improvement in apathy. Expand
Effect of methylphenidate on attention in apathetic AD patients in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial
TLDR
The results suggest MPH can improve attention and apathy in AD; however, the effects appear independent in this population. Expand
Apathy Treatment in Alzheimer's Disease: Interim Results of the ASCOMALVA Trial.
TLDR
The combination ofdonepezil with choline alphoscerate is more effective than donepezil alone in countering symptoms of apathy in AD, which suggests that the availability in brain of a higher amount of acetylcholine could affect apathetic in AD subjects with spared executive functions. Expand
Safety and efficacy of methylphenidate for apathy in Alzheimer's disease: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.
TLDR
Methylphenidate treatment of apathy in Alzheimer's disease was associated with significant improvement in 2 of 3 efficacy outcomes and a trend toward improved global cognition with minimal adverse events, supporting the safety and efficacy of methylphenidates treatment for apathy. Expand
Effect of Methylphenidate on Attention in Apathetic Alzheimer’s Disease Patients and Association with Apathy Changes in a Randomized, Placebo-controlled Trial
Emerging evidence supports the use of methylphenidate (MPH) for the treatment of apathy in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This study aimed to investigate the additional effects of MPH on attention in anExpand
Methylphenidate for apathy and functional status in dementia of the Alzheimer type.
  • P. Padala, W. Burke, +4 authors F. Petty
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The American journal of geriatric psychiatry : official journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry
  • 2010
TLDR
Methylphenidate was well tolerated in these patients with DAT and apathy improved with the use of methylphenidate, and there was no correlation between changes in the AES and depression scores. Expand
Effect of Methylphenidate on Apathy in Patients With Alzheimer Disease: The ADMET 2 Randomized Clinical Trial.
TLDR
Methylphenidate was found to be a safe and efficacious medication to use in the treatment of apathy in Alzheimer disease and the odds ratio of having an improved rating on the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study Clinical Global Impression of Change at 6 months. Expand
Designing a trial to evaluate potential treatments for apathy in dementia: the apathy in dementia methylphenidate trial (ADMET).
  • Lea T. Drye, R. Scherer, +4 authors J. Mintzer
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The American journal of geriatric psychiatry : official journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry
  • 2013
TLDR
The design decisions made for ADMET are important elements to be considered in trials assessing the safety and efficacy of medications for clinically significant apathy in Alzheimer disease. Expand
Pharmacological and Nonpharmacological Treatment for Apathy in Alzheimer Disease
TLDR
Standardized and systematic efforts primarily focused on the study of apathy in AD may establish a benefit from individualized treatment for specific disease groups that would stem from a combination of both pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions. Expand
Is Methylphenidate Effective in Reducing Apathy among Alzheimer’s Disease Patients?
OBJECTIVE The objective of this selective EBM review is to determine whether or not “Is methylphenidate effective in reducing apathy among Alzheimer’s disease patients?” STUDY DESIGN SystematicExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 51 REFERENCES
The spectrum of behavioral responses to cholinesterase inhibitor therapy in Alzheimer disease.
TLDR
Donepezil has psychotropic properties, and pretreatment behaviors help predict patients' responses to treatment, and cognitive response did not change significantly with donepezil treatment within any group. Expand
Methylphenidate May Treat Apathy Independent of Depression
TLDR
A 47-year-old woman with a 20-year history of recurrent major depression was diagnosed as having significant apathy with lack of initiative and motivation and over the course of a 4-week treatment regimen with methylphenidate, her apathy improved, as measured by the Apathy Evaluation Scale. Expand
Methylphenidate and nortriptyline in the treatment of poststroke depression: a retrospective comparison.
TLDR
The hospital charts of elderly stroke patients with major depression who were treated with either methylphenidate or nortriptyline were retrospectively reviewed and suggest that the rapid effects ofethylphenidate may be especially useful to speed recovery from depression so that patients can participate more fully in rehabilitation programs. Expand
A 24-week, randomized, double-blind study of donepezil in moderate to severe Alzheimer’s disease
TLDR
The data suggest that donepezil’s benefits extend into more advanced stages of AD than those previously investigated, with very good tolerability. Expand
Methylphenidate in post liver transplant patients.
TLDR
Methylphenidate appears to be an effective, rapidly acting agent in this setting at dosages of 10-20 mg/day, with minimal side effects, and may have a significant role in the care of an ever-increasing population of organ transplant recipients with multiple medical problems and associated disabilities. Expand
Influence of striatal dopamine transporter availability on the response to methylphenidate in adult patients with ADHD
AbstractIn this study, we investigated whether availability of striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) may have an influence on the response of adult patients with attention deficit hyperactivityExpand
Relative lack of cognitive effects of methylphenidate in elderly male volunteers
TLDR
The results of this study demonstrate that, in elderly subjects, the cognitive effects of methylphenidate are grossly attenuated and distinct from the profile previously described in younger volunteers, and it is suggested thatmethylphenidate may not be appropriate as a pharmacological intervention in elderly patient groups, such as those reporting age-related cognitive decline. Expand
Cholinesterase Inhibitor Therapies and Neuropsychiatric Manifestations of Alzheimer’s Disease
TLDR
Evidence suggests that ChE-Is have psychotropic effects and may be of value in managing neuropsychiatric behavioral symptoms in AD and further studies will be necessary to fully understand the potential of these agents. Expand
A 5-month, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of galantamine in AD
TLDR
Slow dose escalation appears to enhance the tolerability of galantamine, minimizing the incidence and severity of adverse events and significantly benefits the cognitive, functional, and behavioral symptoms of AD. Expand
Methylphenidate treatment of negative symptoms in patients with dementia.
TLDR
Negative symptoms in dementia patients appear responsive to methylphenidate treatment, and this effect may underlie putative changes in symptoms of depression observed by other researchers. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...