Methylation and imprinting: from host defense to gene regulation?

@article{Barlow1993MethylationAI,
  title={Methylation and imprinting: from host defense to gene regulation?},
  author={Denise P. Barlow},
  journal={Science},
  year={1993},
  volume={260},
  pages={309 - 310}
}
  • D. Barlow
  • Published 16 April 1993
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Science
Mammals inherit two complete sets ofchromosomes from their parents and thus two copies of every autosomal gene. Normally both copies are expressed, but, in a minority of cases, a mechanism known as genomic imprinting causes the expression of a gene to vary according to its maternal or paternal origin (1). The raison d'etre of imprinting is unclear. Nevertheless, working on the principle that once you know how, the why be- 
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  • Biology, Medicine
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TLDR
This review compares and contrast what is currently known about the underlying mechanisms, the role of endogenous retroviral elements, and the conservation of canonical and noncanonical genomic imprinting.
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TLDR
This review discusses the evolution of imprinting in Therian mammals, and the importance of imprinted genes in human health and disease.
Insights on imprinting from beyond mice and men.
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  • Biology, Medicine
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  • 2012
TLDR
Examining imprinting across the three mammal groups enables us to test hypotheses on the origin of this phenomenon in mammals and also to investigate changes in the genome coincident with its evolution.
Genomic imprinting in mammals.
TLDR
The aim of this review is to present the phenomenon of parental imprinting as well as its molecular mechanism in various mammals.
A census of mammalian imprinting.
TLDR
There is a high level of discordance of imprinting status between the mouse and human, even when cases in which the orthologue is absent from one species are excluded, and a high proportion of imprinted genes are noncoding RNAs or genes derived by retrotransposition.
The mechanisms of genomic imprinting.
TLDR
There is no a priori reason to invoke fundamentally novel mechanisms to explain the imprinting phenomenon in mammals, and the mechanism(s) of imprinting should perhaps be considered as being the unusual result of combinatory events that occur regularly on an evolutionary scale.
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