Methods in enzymology, vol. 108 Immunochemical techniques; Separation and characterization of lymphoid cells edited by G. Di Sabato, J. J. Langone and H. Van Vunakis, Academic Press, 1984. $69.50/£52.50 (xxvi + 750 pages) ISBN 0 12 182008 4.

Abstract

Methods in Enzyrnology has now broadened its scope well beyond the narrow confines of enzymology. These familiar green volumes are on the shelves of every biomedical library worthy of the name, and should probably be re-named Methods in Biochemistry. (Traditionalists should remember that Immunological Reviews was once called Transplantation Reviews). Volume 108 of Methods in Enzymology is a continuation of a series of issues devoted to immunological techniques. The volume is divided into four parts. The first deals with surgical techniques in immunology. It is fitting that this section begins with an account of bursectomy of chickens by Glick and Olah. Glick's work on bursectomy in 1955-6 was the start of the whole Tand B-cell story, and his paper (rejected by Science and subsequently published in Poultry Science) is one of the classics in immunology. There are useful accounts of thymectomy, skin grafting and adoptive transfer, although the last of these is dealt with very superficially. The second section covers methods for the separation and purification of lymphocytes and macrophages. This section is variable in quality. There are outstanding chapters on velocity sedimentation (R. G. Miller), density separation (K. Shortman), fluorescenceactivated cell sorting (Parks and Herzenberg), and preparation and use of anti-macrophage monoclonal antibodies (Ho and Springer). It is my belief that many of the other techniques described, such as the separation of cells by various agglutination and affinity methods, are not as good. Some of the authors have made attempts to describe the limitations of these techniques, but I am certain that many newcomers to the field will be sadly disillusioned when they try to reproduce t h e m . The third section is devoted to methods for the study of surface immunoglobulin. The chapter by Loor on patching and capping is generally satisfactory, although there is no mention of the 'lipid flow' model of Bretscher. The mixed antiglobulin rosetting reaction is described in some detail by Haegert, but it is not an assay that I find very appealing. The chapters on localization of immunoglobulins by immunoperoxidase and staphylococcal protein A have been somewhat overtaken by the use of colloidal gold, which is hardly mentioned. Yuan and Vitetta give a concise account of the radiolabelling and isolation of membrane immunoglobulin. The preparation and use of fluorescent antibodies is discussed by Forni and de Petris. This chapter would have been a lot more useful if it had given a better account of the biochemical principles involved, instead of a compendium of recipes and anecdotes to be followed by rote. They do not mention the problem of self quenching by rhodamine derivatives, nor do they discuss the use of phycoerythrin as a fluorescent label. Fortunately, this extremely useful and important technique is discussed by Parks and Herzenberg in their chapter on cell sorting. Forni and de Petris also fail to point out the difficulties that many workers have experienced in purifying mouse IgG 1 on protein A, even when the pH is greater than 8.0. The best part of the volume is the fourth section, which deals with methods 375

DOI: 10.1016/0167-5699(85)90100-8

Cite this paper

@article{Goding1985MethodsIE, title={Methods in enzymology, vol. 108 Immunochemical techniques; Separation and characterization of lymphoid cells edited by G. Di Sabato, J. J. Langone and H. Van Vunakis, Academic Press, 1984. \$69.50/£52.50 (xxvi + 750 pages) ISBN 0 12 182008 4.}, author={James W. Goding}, journal={Immunology today}, year={1985}, volume={6 12}, pages={375} }