Methods for Computing Wagner Trees

@article{Farris1970MethodsFC,
  title={Methods for Computing Wagner Trees},
  author={James S Farris},
  journal={Systematic Biology},
  year={1970},
  volume={19},
  pages={83-92}
}
  • J. Farris
  • Published 1 March 1970
  • Biology
  • Systematic Biology
Abstract Farris, J. S. (Biol. Sci., State Univ., Stony Brook, N. Y.) 1970. Methods for computing Wagner Trees. Syst. Zool., 19:8342.-The article derives some properties of Wagner Trees and Networks and describes computational procedures for Prim Networks, the Wagner Method, Rootless Wagner Method and optimization of hypothetical intermediates ( HTUs). The Wagner Ground Plan Analysis method for estimating evolutionary trees has been widely employed in botanical studies (see references in Wagner… 
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