Methane Leaks from North American Natural Gas Systems

@article{Brandt2014MethaneLF,
  title={Methane Leaks from North American Natural Gas Systems},
  author={Adam R. Brandt and Garvin A Heath and Eric A. Kort and Francis O'sullivan and Gabrielle P{\'e}tron and Sarah M. Jordaan and Pieter P. Tans and J. Wilcox and Avi M. Gopstein and Douglas J. Arent and Steven C. Wofsy and Nancy Jeanne Brown and R. Sylvester Bradley and Galen D. Stucky and Dana Eardley and Robert Harriss},
  journal={Science},
  year={2014},
  volume={343},
  pages={733 - 735}
}
Methane emissions from U.S. and Canadian natural gas systems appear larger than official estimates. Natural gas (NG) is a potential “bridge fuel” during transition to a decarbonized energy system: It emits less carbon dioxide during combustion than other fossil fuels and can be used in many industries. However, because of the high global warming potential of methane (CH4, the major component of NG), climate benefits from NG use depend on system leakage rates. Some recent estimates of leakage… Expand
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