Metathesis as a Grammatical Device

@article{Thompson1969MetathesisAA,
  title={Metathesis as a Grammatical Device},
  author={L. C. Thompson and M. T. Thompson},
  journal={International Journal of American Linguistics},
  year={1969},
  volume={35},
  pages={213 - 219}
}
1 A working paper on this topic was presented at the Third International Conference on Salish Languages, at the University of Victoria, August 1968, and we have profited from the discussion on that occasion. The materials on Salishan languages represented here were collected in an ongoing survey of the languages of Northwestern North America. We gratefully acknowledge here the support of the National Science Foundation through grants to the University of Washington and the University of Hawaii… Expand
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