Metacognitive training for schizophrenia spectrum patients: a meta-analysis on outcome studies

@article{vanOosterhout2015MetacognitiveTF,
  title={Metacognitive training for schizophrenia spectrum patients: a meta-analysis on outcome studies},
  author={Bas van Oosterhout and Filip Smit and Lydia Krabbendam and S. Castelein and Anton B.P. Staring and Mark van der Gaag},
  journal={Psychological Medicine},
  year={2015},
  volume={46},
  pages={47 - 57}
}
Background. Metacognitive training (MCT) for schizophrenia spectrum is widely implemented. It is timely to systematically review the literature and to conduct a meta-analysis. Method. Eligible studies were selected from several sources (databases and expert suggestions). Criteria included comparative studies with a MCT condition measuring positive symptoms and/or delusions and/or data-gathering bias. Three meta-analyses were conducted on data gathering (three studies; 219 participants… Expand
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TLDR
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Is metacognitive training for psychosis effective?
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TLDR
More randomized trials that use standardized outcome measures, that use intention-to-treat analyses, and that follow-up participants at regular intervals after the intervention are needed to determine whether or not MCT should become a recommended adjunctive treatment for schizophrenia. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
MCT, a low-intensity training aimed at enhancing patients' awareness of cognitive biases subserving paranoia, led to improvement in delusion symptoms relative to the control condition and over and above the effects of antipsychotic medication. Expand
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TLDR
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