Metabolism and heat balance in an arboreal marsupial, the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)

@article{Degabriele2004MetabolismAH,
  title={Metabolism and heat balance in an arboreal marsupial, the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)},
  author={Robert Degabriele and Terence J Dawson},
  journal={Journal of comparative physiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={134},
  pages={293-301}
}
Summary1.The insulation of the pelt of the koala (0.529 °C W−1m2 in still air) is the highest reported for a marsupial. The fur also has a high level of insulative resistance to wind. The dorsal surface is more densely furred and less reflective of solar radiation than the ventral surface and different postural adjustments, particularly in relation to wind direction, allow for insulative flexibility.2.The basal body temperature of the koala under laboratory conditions was 35.7°C at an ambient… 
Biophysical properties of the pelt of a diurnal marsupial, the numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus), and its role in thermoregulation
TLDR
The numbat's high solar heat gain is not associated with the same degree of reduction in coat resistance as seen for other mammals, suggesting that its pelt has structural and spectral characteristics that enhance both solar heat acquisition and endogenous heat conservation.
Body temperature of free-ranging koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) in south-east Queensland
TLDR
This study is the first to report on body temperature of free-ranging koalas in their normal behavioural context, and further investigations are necessary to determine the physiological boundaries of the thermal niche for this species, in order to better equip models that will more accurately predict the impacts of climate change on koala.
Implications of the large surface area to body mass ratio on the heat balance of the greater glider (Petauroides volans: Marsupialia)
TLDR
It is concluded that the greater glider can utilize its gliding membranes to reduce heat losses by increasing the insulative layer around the body surface.
The Comparative Energetics of New Guinean Cuscuses (Metatheria: Phalangeridae)
  • B. McNab
  • Biology, Environmental Science
  • 2008
TLDR
The uniformity in marsupial basal rate, independent of body mass, reflects a form of reproduction that cannot exploit high basal rates and is generally found in species limited to low altitudes.
Physiological implications of climate change for a critically endangered Australian marsupial
TLDR
Physiological data can be incorporated into mechanistic species distribution models to test the hypothesis that western ringtail possums should physiologically tolerate the climate of habitat further inland than their current distribution, and withstand moderate impacts of climate change in the south-west of Western Australia.
Digestion and energy metabolism in a small arboreal marsupial, the Greater Glider (Petauroides volans), fed high-terpeneEucalyptus foliage
  • W. Foley
  • Medicine
    Journal of Comparative Physiology B
  • 2004
TLDR
The efficiency with which ME substituted for tissue energy was high, so that greater gliders were able to maintain energy balance and body mass onE.
Meeting the energy demands of reproduction in female koalas, Phascolarctos cinereus: evidence for energetic compensation
TLDR
As the nutritional requirements of females at peak lactation are the highest of any members of the population, low reproductive requirements effectively increase the types and amount of habitat able to support koala populations.
Climate change and the koala Phascolarctos cinereus: water and energy
TLDR
Neither females with pouch young nor those with back young had significantly different FMR to that of females without young, confirming that koalas may compartmentalize energy demands during lactation.
The limit to the distribution of a rainforest marsupial folivore is consistent with the thermal intolerance hypothesis
TLDR
The role of thermal intolerance as a possible mechanism limiting the distribution of Pseudochirops archeri (green ringtail possum), a specialist arboreal folivore restricted to rainforests above an altitude of 300 m in Australia's Wet Tropics, is examined.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 35 REFERENCES
Thermoregulatory responses of the arid zone kangaroos, Megaleia rufa and Macropus robustus.
  • T. Dawson
  • Environmental Science
    Comparative biochemistry and physiology. A, Comparative physiology
  • 1973
The comparative energetics of neotropical marsupials
  • B. McNab
  • Environmental Science
    Journal of comparative physiology
  • 2004
TLDR
It is suggested that marsupials have a form of reproduction that may be energetically more expensive than that found in placentals, which may require marsupial to maintain a low basal rate of metabolism.
Bioenergetics and body size in dasyurid marsupials
MACMILLEN, RICHARD E., AND TOHN E:. NELSON. Bioenergetics and body size in dusyurid marsupials. Am. j. Physiol. 2 17(4) : 1246-l 251. 1969.-Basal. metabolic rate, weight-specific conductance, and
The cuscus (Phalanger maculatus) — a marsupial sloth?
TLDR
The thermal balance of the spotted cuscus and the role of the fur in this balance were determined at various environmental temperatures, suggesting a pattern of thermal adaptation to the tropics similar to that of the sloths.
Standard metabolism and thermoregulation in a prosimian Perodicticus potto.
  • G. Hildwein, M. Goffart
  • Environmental Science
    Comparative biochemistry and physiology. A, Comparative physiology
  • 1975
Standard metabolism, body temperature, and surface areas of Australian marsupials.
TLDR
The standard metabolism of marsupials was found to be proportional to almost the same fractional power of body weight, 0.75, as that of eutherian mammals and the whole animal kingdom in general.
Thermal balance of the macropodid marsupial Macropus eugenii Desmarest.
Seasonal variations in the body temperatures of unrestrained kangaroos (Macropodidae: Marsupialia).
  • G. Brown, T. Dawson
  • Environmental Science
    Comparative biochemistry and physiology. A, Comparative physiology
  • 1977
Standard metabolism and body temperature of perameloid marsupials from different environments.
  • A. Hulbert, T. Dawson
  • Environmental Science, Biology
    Comparative biochemistry and physiology. A, Comparative physiology
  • 1974
Digestion and Nitrogen Metabolism in the Koala, Phascolarctos Cinereus.
TLDR
The digestive tract of the koala, presumably aided by the relatively large caecum, is well suited to the fibrous dietary matter on which the animal feeds, and compared favourably with values reported for various other herbivorous mammals.
...
...