Metabolisable energy consumption in the exclusively breast-fed infant aged 3–6 months from the developed world: a systematic review

@article{Reilly2005MetabolisableEC,
  title={Metabolisable energy consumption in the exclusively breast-fed infant aged 3–6 months from the developed world: a systematic review},
  author={John J. Reilly and Susan Ashworth and Jonathan C K Wells},
  journal={British Journal of Nutrition},
  year={2005},
  volume={94},
  pages={56 - 63}
}
The present study aimed to evaluate evidence on metabolisable energy consumption and pattern of consumption with age in infants in the developed world who were exclusively breast-fed, at around the time of introducing complementary feeding. We carried out a systematic review aimed at answering three questions: how much milk is transferred from mother to infant?; does transfer increase with the age of the infant?; and what is the metabolisable energy content of breast milk? Thirty-three eligible… 
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