Metabolic syndrome and metabolic abnormalities in patients with major depressive disorder: a meta-analysis of prevalences and moderating variables

@article{Vancampfort2013MetabolicSA,
  title={Metabolic syndrome and metabolic abnormalities in patients with major depressive disorder: a meta-analysis of prevalences and moderating variables},
  author={Davy Vancampfort and Christoph U. Correll and Martien Wampers and Pascal Sienaert and Alex J Mitchell and Amber De Herdt and Michel Probst and Thomas W. Scheewe and Marc De Hert},
  journal={Psychological Medicine},
  year={2013},
  volume={44},
  pages={2017 - 2028}
}
Background Individuals with depression have an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) is an important risk factor for CVD. We aimed to clarify the prevalence and correlates of MetS in persons with robustly defined major depressive disorder (MDD). Method We searched Medline, PsycINFO, EMBASE and CINAHL up until June 2013 for studies reporting MetS prevalences in individuals with MDD. Medical subject headings ‘metabolic’ OR ‘diabetes’ or ‘cardiovascular’ or… Expand
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TLDR
Somatic affective symptoms of depression are positively associated, while cognitive-affective symptoms are negatively associated with MetS. Expand
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TLDR
The results further support the subtyping of MDD and highlight the particular need for prevention and treatment of metabolic consequences in patients with atypical MDD. Expand
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TLDR
Compared to Non-early weight gainers, patients with early weight gain in the first month of antidepressant treatment have a significant higher risk of developing MetS during the 6 months of treatment. Expand
The metabolic syndrome and related characteristics in major depression: inpatients and outpatients compared: metabolic differences across treatment settings.
TLDR
Although overall MetSyn prevalences did not differ, patterns of individual MetSyn-related variables differed more markedly across depressed inpatients and outpatients. Expand
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