Metabolic rate, blood sugar and the utilization of carbohydrate.

@article{Edwards1934MetabolicRB,
  title={Metabolic rate, blood sugar and the utilization of carbohydrate.},
  author={H. T. Edwards and Rodolfo Margaria and David Bruce Dill},
  journal={American Journal of Physiology},
  year={1934},
  volume={108},
  pages={203-209}
}
The many observations on blood sugar in exercise have revealed widely different conditions. Thus one may have extreme hypoglycemia as found by Levine, Burgess and Derick (1) in some marathon runners, or at the other extreme, hyperglycemia as in football players (2). A moderate decrease in the concentration of sugar in the blood (B. S.) has been found by Christiansen (3) in exercise of one hour’s duration; in recovery following exercise both Rakestraw (4) and Christiansen report moderate… 

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