Metabolic equivalents (METS) in exercise testing, exercise prescription, and evaluation of functional capacity

@article{Jett1990MetabolicE,
  title={Metabolic equivalents (METS) in exercise testing, exercise prescription, and evaluation of functional capacity},
  author={M. Jett{\'e} and K. H. Sidney and Gerhard Bluemchen},
  journal={Clinical Cardiology},
  year={1990},
  volume={13}
}
One metabolic equivalent (MET) is defined as the amount of oxygen consumed while sitting at rest and is equal to 3.5 ml O2 per kg body weight x min. The MET concept represents a simple, practical, and easily understood procedure for expressing the energy cost of physical activities as a multiple of the resting metabolic rate. The energy cost of an activity can be determined by dividing the relative oxygen cost of the activity (ml O2/kg/min)x by 3.5. This article summarizes and presents energy… 
The Metabolic Equivalent: Reevaluating What We Know About the MET
TLDR
There is, however, increasing evidence that the current MET value, when expressed as a resting measure, significantly overestimates directly measured resting oxygen consumption values and caloric expenditure, potentially reducing the accuracy of the MET as a tool for estimating energy expenditure and calories expenditure during physical activity.
Metabolic equivalent: one size does not fit all.
TLDR
Using measured or predicted RMR as a correction factor can appropriately adjust for individual differences when estimating the energy cost of moderate intensity walking, and the 1-MET of 1 kcal/h overestimates resting energy expenditure by 20%.
Examination of the Estimated Resting Metabolic Equivalent (MET) in Overweight and Obesity
Background: Energy expenditure is commonly expressed in multiples of the resting metabolic equivalent task (MET), with 1 MET estimated to be equivalent to 3.5 ml/kg/min or 0.250 L/min of oxygen
Obtaining a formula that improves maximum oxygen consumption estimation in cycle ergometer exercise tests
TLDR
Estimating the METs with the conventional table is reliable, however, the best adjustment in subjects with normal bicycle exercise SPECT was obtained when, in addition to watts and BMI, age and gender were also considered.
Comparison of Conventional and Individualized 1-MET Values for Expressing Maximum Aerobic Metabolic Rate and Habitual Activity Related Energy Expenditure
TLDR
The conventional 1-MET-value appears inappropriate for determining the aerobic metabolic capacity and AEE in active and endurance-trained persons.
[Obtaining a formula that improves maximum oxygen consumption estimation in cycle ergometer exercise tests].
TLDR
Estimating the METs with the conventional table is reliable, however, the best adjustment in subjects with normal bicycle exercise SPECT was obtained when, in addition to watts and BMI, age and gender were also considered.
Using Metabolic Equivalents in Clinical Practice.
TLDR
For previously inactive adults, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, which corresponds to ≥3 METs, may increase MET capacity and decrease the risk of future cardiac events.
Influence of appendicular skeletal muscle mass on resting metabolic equivalents in patients with cardiovascular disease: Implications for exercise training and prescription
TLDR
It was hypothesized that patients with a lower skeletal muscle mass would also have a lower RMR, determined by resting respiratory gas analysis, and this would affect the accuracy of the aerobic exercise prescription based on METs, and the potential limitations of using the estimated MET were evaluated.
Nomogram based on metabolic equivalents and age for assessing aerobic exercise capacity in men.
TLDR
Norms for METs based on age are presented as well as population-specific nomograms that enable physicians to assess patients' exercise capacity relative to their age group.
Standardized MET Value Underestimates the Energy Cost of Treadmill Running in Men.
TLDR
The reference MET value considerably overestimated observed resting VO2 in men with low VO2max, resulting in underestimations of the maximal MET, exercise intensity prescription, and the energy cost of running.
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