Metabolic engineering for improved fermentation of pentoses by yeasts

@article{Jeffries2004MetabolicEF,
  title={Metabolic engineering for improved fermentation of pentoses by yeasts},
  author={Thomas W. Jeffries and Y.-S Jin},
  journal={Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology},
  year={2004},
  volume={63},
  pages={495-509}
}
  • T. Jeffries, Y.-S Jin
  • Published 1 February 2004
  • Biology, Engineering
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
Abstract The fermentation of xylose is essential for the bioconversion of lignocellulose to fuels and chemicals, but wild-type strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae do not metabolize xylose, so researchers have engineered xylose metabolism in this yeast. Glucose transporters mediate xylose uptake, but no transporter specific for xylose has yet been identified. Over-expressing genes for aldose (xylose) reductase, xylitol dehydrogenase and moderate levels of xylulokinase enable xylose assimilation… 
Transcription analysis of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals novel responses to xylose
TLDR
It is suggested that cells metabolizing xylose are not in a completely repressed or in a derepressed state either, indicating thatxylose was recognized neither as a fermentable nor as a respirative carbon source.
Development of efficient xylose fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: xylose isomerase as a key component.
TLDR
Additional evolutionary engineering was used to improve the fermentation kinetics of mixed-substrate utilisation, resulting in efficient D-xylose utilisation in synthetic media, and strain robustness, especially with respect to tolerance to inhibitors present in hydrolysates, can still be further improved.
Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for increased bioconversion of lignocellulose to ethanol
TLDR
The genes coding xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase from Pichia stipitis were successfully engineered into Saccharomyces cerevisae and engineering of XYL1 and XYL2 into yeasts significantly increased the microbial biomass and ethanol yield.
Ethanol production from xylose in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: current state and perspectives
TLDR
In this review, recent progress with regard to studies using several promising approaches such as host strain selection and adaptation to obtain further improved xylose-utilizing S. cerevisiae strains are addressed.
Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of simultaneous cellobiose and xylose fermentation
TLDR
Improved yields and productivities from cofermentation experiments performed with simulated cellulosic hydrolyzates are observed, suggesting this is a promising coferment strategy for cellulosIC biofuel production.
Effects of xylitol dehydrogenase (XYL2) on xylose fermentation by engineered Candida glycerinogenes
TLDR
It was found that additional overexpression of XYL2 under the control of strong promoters in a xylose‐fermenting strain not only reduced xylitol accumulation but also increased glycerol yields.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 180 REFERENCES
Xylose fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae
TLDR
Limitations of xylose utilization in S. cerevisiae cells are very likely caused by an insufficient capacity of the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, as indicated by accumulation of sedoheptulose-7-phosphate and the absence of fructose-1,6-bisph phosphate and pyruvate accumulation.
Conversion of xylose to ethanol by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae: importance of xylulokinase (XKS1) and oxygen availability.
TLDR
Intracellular metabolite analyses and in vitro enzyme activities suggest that the control of flux in a strain that overexpresses XKS1 has shifted to the nonoxidative steps of the pentose phosphate pathway (i.e., downstream of xylose 5-phosphate), and enzymatic steps in the lower part of glycolysis and ethanol formation pathways do not have a high flux control in this recombinant strain.
Anaerobic Xylose Fermentation by Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Carrying XYL1, XYL2, andXKS1 in Mineral Medium Chemostat Cultures
TLDR
To quantitatively analyze metabolic fluxes in recombinant S. cerevisiae during metabolism of xylose-glucose mixtures, a stable xylOSE-utilizing recombinant strain was constructed, and Anaerobic ethanol formation fromxylose by recombinantS.
Characterization of the xylose-transporting properties of yeast hexose transporters and their influence on xylose utilization.
TLDR
Xylose uptake does not determine the xylose flux under the conditions and in the yeast strains investigated, and several heterologous monosaccharide transporters from bacteria and plant cells did not confer sufficient uptake activity to restore growth on xylOSE.
Genetic engineering for improved xylose fermentation by yeasts.
  • T. Jeffries, N. Shi
  • Biology, Medicine
    Advances in biochemical engineering/biotechnology
  • 1999
TLDR
The central pathways for glucose and xylose metabolism, the principal respiratory pathways, the factors determining partitioning of pyruvate between respiration and fermentation, the known genetic mechanisms for glucoseand oxygen regulation, and progress to date in improving xylOSE fermentations by yeasts are reviewed.
Xylulokinase Overexpression in Two Strains ofSaccharomyces cerevisiae Also Expressing Xylose Reductase and Xylitol Dehydrogenase and Its Effect on Fermentation of Xylose and Lignocellulosic Hydrolysate
TLDR
The results demonstrate that strain background and modulation of XKS1 expression are important for generating an efficient xylose-fermenting recombinant strain of S. cerevisiae.
Xylose utilisation by recombinant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on different carbon sources
Abstract Autoselective xylose-utilising strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the xylose reductase (XYL1) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XYL2) genes of Pichia stipitis were constructed by
Fermentation of corn fibre sugars by an engineered xylose utilizing Saccharomyces yeast strain
The ability of a recombinant Saccharomyces yeast strain to ferment the sugars glucose, xylose, arabinose and galactose which are the predominant monosaccharides found in corn fibre hydrolysates has
Xylose-metabolizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains overexpressing the TKL1 and TAL1 genes encoding the pentose phosphate pathway enzymes transketolase and transaldolase
TLDR
The results indicate that the transaldolase level in S. cerevisiae is insufficient for the efficient utilization of pentose phosphate pathway metabolites.
Reduced Oxidative Pentose Phosphate Pathway Flux in Recombinant Xylose-Utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Improves the Ethanol Yield from Xylose
TLDR
Results indicate that xylitol production is strongly connected to the flux through the oxidative part of the pentose phosphate pathway, leading to a lower rate of xylose consumption.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...