Metabolic effects of dietary fructose

@article{Hallfrisch1990MetabolicEO,
  title={Metabolic effects of dietary fructose},
  author={J. Hallfrisch},
  journal={The FASEB Journal},
  year={1990},
  volume={4},
  pages={2652 - 2660}
}
Fructose, a naturally occurring hexose, is a component of many fruits, vegetables, and sweeteners. Because of the introduction of high fructose corn sweeteners in 1967, the amount of free fructose in the diet of Americans has increased substantially in the last 20 years. Fructose is sweeter, more soluble, and less glucogenic than glucose or sucrose, so it has been recommended as a replacement for these sugars in the diets of diabetic and obese people. Although an acute dose of fructose causes… Expand
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References

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TLDR
It is reasonable to allow diabetic patients to consume sugar-containing foods as long as they do so in a controlled fashion, and the available evidence suggests that sucrose has a glycemic effect similar to that of bread, potatoes, and rice. Expand
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TLDR
It is concluded that short-term replacement of other carbohydrate sources in the diabetic diet with fructose will improve glycemic control, whereas replacement with sucrose will not aggravate glycemic Control. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
Recommendations for including large amounts of fructose in the diet should also be based on a complete evaluation of the effect on other metabolic risk factors, as these results generally show a beneficial effect of fructose on glucose tolerance. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
Fructose increases the levels of risk factors associated with heart disease, especially in hyperinsulinemic men, and total triglycerides, total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and uric acid were significantly greater after the consumption of fructose than after cornstarch. Expand
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TLDR
Results indicate that oral fructose can be insulinogenic in humans when blood glucose levels are elevated, and that subjects whose blood glucose response levels were above 155 mg% after a glucose-containing drink appeared to be particularly responsive to the effects of fructose. Expand
Metabolic effects of fructose as a natural sweetener in the physiologic meals of ambulatory obese patients with type II diabetes.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that addition of moderate amounts of fructose as a natural sweetener in the physiologic mixed meal does not appear to have deleterious effects on glycemic control and lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in ambulatory obese patients with type II diabetes and poor metabolic control. Expand
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TLDR
Fructose but not glucose feeding led to impaired insulin action in both the liver and peripheral tissues, effects that may depend on antecedent circulating triglyceride levels. Expand
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