Meta-analysis of risk factors for posttraumatic stress disorder in trauma-exposed adults.

@article{Brewin2000MetaanalysisOR,
  title={Meta-analysis of risk factors for posttraumatic stress disorder in trauma-exposed adults.},
  author={Chris R. Brewin and Bernice Andrews and John D. Valentine},
  journal={Journal of consulting and clinical psychology},
  year={2000},
  volume={68 5},
  pages={
          748-66
        }
}
Meta-analyses were conducted on 14 separate risk factors for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and the moderating effects of various sample and study characteristics, including civilian/military status, were examined. Three categories of risk factor emerged: Factors such as gender, age at trauma, and race that predicted PTSD in some populations but not in others; factors such as education, previous trauma, and general childhood adversity that predicted PTSD more consistently but to a… 

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  • Psychology
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