Meta-analysis adjusting for compliance: the example of screening for breast cancer.

@article{Glasziou1992MetaanalysisAF,
  title={Meta-analysis adjusting for compliance: the example of screening for breast cancer.},
  author={Paul Glasziou},
  journal={Journal of clinical epidemiology},
  year={1992},
  volume={45 11},
  pages={1251-6}
}
Randomized controlled trials are usually analysed by the group to which the patient was randomized, i.e. by "intention-to-treat", regardless of the degree of compliance. However, the "explanatory" effect, i.e. the effect that would occur if we had 100% compliance, is often of interest. This "explanatory" effect is diluted by poor compliance, and hence meta-analyses should ideally avoid both the heterogeneity of effect due to variation in compliance rates among studies, and the undeserved weight… CONTINUE READING