Meta‐analysis of the association between the catecholamine‐O‐methyl‐transferase gene and obsessive‐compulsive disorder

@article{Azzam2003MetaanalysisOT,
  title={Meta‐analysis of the association between the catecholamine‐O‐methyl‐transferase gene and obsessive‐compulsive disorder},
  author={Amin Azzam and Carol A. Mathews},
  journal={American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics},
  year={2003},
  volume={123B}
}
  • A. Azzam, C. Mathews
  • Published 15 November 2003
  • Psychology, Biology
  • American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics
Obsessive‐compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic, severely debilitating mental illness that affects approximately 1–2% of the population. Data from twin and family studies have shown that genetic factors contribute to the expression of the disease. The dopaminergic system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of OCD, and catecholamine‐O‐methyl‐transferase (COMT) is a key modulator of dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission. The gene for COMT has a common polymorphism that has been… 
Reduced 3‐O‐methyl‐dopa levels in OCD patients and their unaffected parents is associated with the low activity M158 COMT allele
  • R. Delorme, C. Betancur, J. Launay
  • Psychology, Biology
    American journal of medical genetics. Part B, Neuropsychiatric genetics : the official publication of the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics
  • 2010
TLDR
A role of COMT in the susceptibility to OCD is supported and evidence that 3‐OMD levels could represent an endophenotype in OCD is provided, suggesting that COMT activity could act as a limiting factor for the production of 3-OMD in OCD patients and in their relatives.
The role of the COMT Val158Met polymorphism in the phenotypic expression of obsessive‐compulsive disorder
  • H. Katerberg, D. Cath, J. D. den Boer
  • Psychology, Biology
    American journal of medical genetics. Part B, Neuropsychiatric genetics : the official publication of the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics
  • 2010
TLDR
A dimensional approach seems fruitful in detecting genes of importance for OCD, with possible sex‐specific associations between the COMT Val158Met polymorphism and OCD or dimensional phenotypes.
Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Gene Polymorphisms in Specific Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder Patients’ Subgroups
TLDR
The data suggest an influence of COMT polymorphisms on OCD and OCD patients’ features, such as gender, and ordering, washing, and hoarding symptom dimensions, are suggested.
The met158 allele of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder in men: case–control study and meta-analysis
TLDR
It is concluded that COMT may play a role in the genetic aetiology of OCD in men by the functionality of the val158met polymorphism in terms of its effect on COMT enzyme activity, and by the role of COMT in cortical dopamine signalling and information processing.
Meta‐analysis of COMT val158met in panic disorder: Ethnic heterogeneity and gender specificity
TLDR
The present meta‐analysis provides tentative support for the COMT val158met polymorphism as a possible risk factor for panic disorder, with differential effects in Caucasian and Asian populations, and suggests a female‐specific effect.
The catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) gene as a candidate for psychiatric phenotypes: evidence and lessons
TLDR
The current state of evidence of catechol-O-methyl transferase, one of the most studied genes for psychosis, is considered and the implications both for further studies of COMT and more generally for studies of other genes are considered.
Relationship of catechol-O-methyltransferase to schizophrenia and its correlates: evidence for associations and complex interactions.
TLDR
Examination of evidence for the role of COMT in schizophrenia pathogenesis, associations between COMT and cognitive and behavioral correlates of schizophrenia and related disorders is examined, and evidence for complex interactions involving COMT is examined.
Molecular genetics of obsessive–compulsive disorder: a comprehensive meta-analysis of genetic association studies
  • S. Taylor
  • Biology, Psychology
    Molecular Psychiatry
  • 2013
TLDR
It is demonstrated that OCD is associated with multiple genes, with most having a modest association with OCD, which suggests a polygenic model of OCD, consistent with twin studies, in which multiple genes make small, incremental contributions to the risk of developing the disorder.
Low expression of catecholamine-O-methyl-transferase gene in obsessive-compulsive disorder.
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TLDR
It is shown that a common functional allele of this gene, which results in a 3- to 4-fold reduction in enzyme activity, is significantly associated in a recessive manner with susceptibility to OCD, particularly in males.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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