Mercury Exposure Affects the Reproductive Success of a Free-Living Terrestrial Songbird, the Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus)

@inproceedings{Jackson2011MercuryEA,
  title={Mercury Exposure Affects the Reproductive Success of a Free-Living Terrestrial Songbird, the Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus)},
  author={Allyson K. Jackson and David C. Evers and Matthew A. Etterson and Anne M. Condon and Sarah B. Folsom and Jennifer Detweiler and John Schmerfeld and Daniel A. Cristol},
  year={2011}
}
ABSTRACT. Despite mounting evidence of mercury accumulation in terrestrial ecosystems, few data exist on how environmental mercury exposure affects reproductive success in free-living songbirds. From 2007 through 2010, we monitored reproductive success of Carolina Wrens (Thryothorus ludovicianus) breeding along the forest floodplain of two mercury-contaminated rivers in Virginia. Using an information-theoretic approach, we found a 34% reduction in nesting success of Carolina Wrens on mercury… 

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