Mental time travel in animals?

@article{Suddendorf2003MentalTT,
  title={Mental time travel in animals?},
  author={Thomas Suddendorf and Janie Busby},
  journal={Trends in Cognitive Sciences},
  year={2003},
  volume={7},
  pages={391-396}
}

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