• Corpus ID: 27069518

Mental health training for law enforcement professionals.

@article{Vermette2005MentalHT,
  title={Mental health training for law enforcement professionals.},
  author={Heidi Vermette and Debra A. Pinals and Paul S. Appelbaum},
  journal={The journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law},
  year={2005},
  volume={33 1},
  pages={
          42-6
        }
}
The purpose of this pilot study was to determine topics of interest and preferred modalities of training for police officers in their work with persons with mental illness. Police officers across Massachusetts attending in-service mental health training were asked to rate the importance of potential mental health topics and the effectiveness of potential training modalities on a Likert-type scale. Additional data collected included the officer's experience, level of education, motivation for… 

Tables from this paper

Investigating police officers' perceptions of their role in pathways to mental healthcare.
TLDR
It is suggested that strengthening multi-agency working and improving training might positively influence police officers' views of their role and maximise their contribution to improving emergency mental healthcare.
Police Attitudes Toward Seeking Professional Mental Health Treatment
TLDR
Results indicate that years of experience and mental health training may improve attitudes toward seeking help for mental health, and offers suggestions for law enforcement organizations to consider to encourage their members to seek help formental health difficulties.
Implementing mental health training programmes for non-mental health trained professionals: A qualitative synthesis
TLDR
It is recommended that research evaluating mental health training includes a qualitative component to ensure that the barriers and facilitators to training and its impact on trainees’ perceptions of mental health are understood.
Stigma of Mental Illness: an Exploration of Rural Law Enforcement Attitudes Toward Mental Health in the Heartland
TLDR
Results from the current study suggest rural law enforcement officers hold overall positive views of mental illness, however, findings continue to outline the need for increased resources for those with a mental illness and those working in rural communities.
The police-based crisis intervention team (CIT) model: I. Effects on officers' knowledge, attitudes, and skills.
TLDR
CIT training of police officers resulted in sizable and persisting improvements in diverse aspects of knowledge, attitudes, and skills, and research should now address potential outcomes at the system level and for individuals with whom officers interact.
Educating law enforcement officers about mental illness: nurses as teachers.
  • Jeannine Loucks
  • Psychology, Law
    Journal of psychosocial nursing and mental health services
  • 2013
TLDR
An exemplar educational program geared to staff police officers in the city of Orange, California is described, which provides law enforcement officers with training about psychiatric disorders and affected individuals, effective communication skills, and interventions that may assist in management of field contacts with individuals with mental illness.
Content and Adequacy of Specialized Police Training to Handle Youth-Related Incidents
TLDR
The data suggest that the academy focus on training generalists has the effect of increasing the impact and importance of informal socialization by field training officers on officer perceptions and procedures for handling youth-related incidents.
Crisis intervention team training for police officers responding to mental disturbance calls.
TLDR
A CIT partnership between the police department, the mental health system, consumers of services, and their family members can help in efforts to assist persons who are experiencing a mental illness crisis to gain access to the treatment system, where such individuals most often are best served.
Police perceptions of their encounters with individuals experiencing mental illness: A Victorian survey
TLDR
Recommendations for police training, while based on practical wisdom, need to be multi-modal and should engage mental health experts in design and delivery.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 14 REFERENCES
The police and mental health.
TLDR
The authors describe a variety of mobile crisis teams composed of police, mental health professionals, or both and the need for police officers to have training in recognizing mental illness and knowing how to access mental health resources is emphasized.
California law enforcement agencies and the mentally ill offender.
TLDR
The results suggest that most law enforcement officers are given insufficient training to identify, manage, and appropriately refer the MIOs they are increasingly likely to encounter, and peace officers are as likely to be called to a mental illness crisis as to a robbery.
Effect of a mental health educational program upon police officers.
TLDR
It is suggested that educational programs can impact nonhealth care worker in contact with the emotionally disturbed in order to improve knowledge and attitudes of police officers toward people experiencing emotional difficulty.
Emerging partnerships between mental health and law enforcement.
TLDR
At least two-thirds of all departments, even those with no specialized response program, rated themselves as moderately or very effective in dealing with mentally ill persons in crisis.
Comparing outcomes of major models of police responses to mental health emergencies.
TLDR
Data strongly suggest that collaborations between the criminal justice system, the mental health system, and the advocacy community plus essential services reduce the inappropriate use of U.S. jails to house persons with acute symptoms of mental illness.
Police perspectives on responding to mentally ill people in crisis: perceptions of program effectiveness.
TLDR
Officers from departments relying on a mobile crisis unit (MCU) and on police-based social workers both rated their programs as being moderately effective on each of these dimensions except for minimizing officer time on these calls where the MCU had significantly lower ratings.
Policing the emotionally disturbed.
  • J. Fyfe
  • Law
    The journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law
  • 2000
TLDR
The decrease in EDP shootings may not hold true in manysmaller and midsized U.S. police jurisdictions, as in most big cities, police apparently have become muchmore sophisticated in helping officers to avoid shootings of all kinds, in cluding those involving EDPs.
Improving high risk encounters between people with mental illness and the police.
  • R. Borum
  • Medicine, Psychology
    The journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law
  • 2000
Borum, Randy, "Improving high risk encounters between people with mental illness and police" (2000).
Crisis Intervention in Law Enforcement
A community policing approach to persons with mental illness.
  • G. Cordner
  • Medicine
    The journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law
  • 2000
...
...