Mental health profiles among married, never-married, and separated/divorced mothers in a nationally representative sample

@article{Afifi2005MentalHP,
  title={Mental health profiles among married, never-married, and separated/divorced mothers in a nationally representative sample},
  author={Tracie O. Afifi and Brian J. Cox and Murray W. Enns},
  journal={Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology},
  year={2005},
  volume={41},
  pages={122-129}
}
  • T. Afifi, B. Cox, M. Enns
  • Published 9 February 2006
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
BackgroundSeveral studies have found that married mothers compared to single mothers had better mental health (Cairney et al. in Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol 38:442–449, 2003; Cairney et al. in Can J Public Health 90:320–324, 1999; Davies et al. in J Marriage Fam 59:294–308, 1997; Lipman et al. in Am J Psychiatry 158:73–77, 2001; Wang in Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol 39:26–32, 2004). Although a relationship between family structure (single vs married mothers) and psychiatric… 

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