Mental health of long‐term survivors of childhood and young adult cancer: A systematic review

@article{Friend2018MentalHO,
  title={Mental health of long‐term survivors of childhood and young adult cancer: A systematic review},
  author={Amanda Jane Friend and Richard G. Feltbower and Emily Hughes and Kristian P Dye and Adam W. Glaser},
  journal={International Journal of Cancer},
  year={2018},
  volume={143}
}
Childhood cancer is increasing in prevalence whilst survival rates are improving. The prevalence of adult survivors of childhood cancer is consequently increasing. Many survivors suffer long‐term consequences of their cancer treatment. Whilst many of these are well documented, relatively little is known about the mental health of survivors of childhood cancer. This article aimed to describe the prevalence and spectrum of mental health problems found in adult survivors of childhood cancer using… Expand
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