Mental disorders among U.S. military personnel in the 1990s: association with high levels of health care utilization and early military attrition.

@article{Hoge2002MentalDA,
  title={Mental disorders among U.S. military personnel in the 1990s: association with high levels of health care utilization and early military attrition.},
  author={Charles William Hoge and Sandra E. Lesikar and ra Mario Alberto Bermejo Guevara and Jeff Lange and John F. Brundage and Charles C Engel and Stephen Craig Messer and David T. Orman},
  journal={The American journal of psychiatry},
  year={2002},
  volume={159 9},
  pages={
          1576-83
        }
}
  • C. Hoge, S. Lesikar, D. Orman
  • Published 1 September 2002
  • Medicine, Political Science, Psychology
  • The American journal of psychiatry
OBJECTIVE Epidemiological studies have shown that mental disorders are associated with reduced health-related quality of life, high levels of health care utilization, and work absenteeism. However, measurement of the burden of mental disorders by using population-based methods in large working populations, such as the U.S. military, has been limited. METHOD Analysis of hospitalizations among all active-duty military personnel (16.4 million person-years) from 1990 to 1999 and ambulatory visits… 

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