Menopause: Adaptation or epiphenomenon?

@article{Peccei2001MenopauseAO,
  title={Menopause: Adaptation or epiphenomenon?},
  author={J. S. Peccei},
  journal={Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues},
  year={2001},
  volume={10}
}
  • J. S. Peccei
  • Published 2001
  • Biology
  • Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues
  • Evolutionary biologists consider all complex design features of organisms to be ultimately the result of natural selection. As such, menopause can always be considered an adaptation. At the same time, it is also recognized that an adaptation is always morphologically, physiologically, and developmentally constrained by an organism’s phylogenetic heritage.18 The question of origin is whether menopause is primarily an adaptation, in the sense that selection directly favored a postreproductive… CONTINUE READING
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