Corpus ID: 59118814

Men and health: a literature review

@inproceedings{McKinlay2005MenAH,
  title={Men and health: a literature review},
  author={Eileen McKinlay},
  year={2005}
}
The Assessment of Men’s Risk of STI and HIV in the General Practice Setting
TLDR
This chapter discusses STI and the sexual health of men in the 20 th century through the lens of a literature review of the medicalisation of sex and its implications for healthcare. Expand
¡Y ahora viene el hombre! Estrategias de cuidado para la salud de los hombres
Abstract This is a qualitative study from the perspective of dia-lectical hermeneutics on healthcare strategies for men in the view of health professionals. The authors drew on 18 semi-structuredExpand
The State of Men's Health in Europe
A better understanding of the health of men is essential for two main reasons. The first relates to the need for our male population to be as fit and able as possible. The second is tied to theExpand
Men's health around the world: a review of policy and progress across 11 countries
TLDR
The authors' hard work will contribute to enhancing the public policy profile of men's health in their country and without which this project would have never seen the light of day. Expand
A Whānau Ora Journey of Māori Men with Chronic Illness: A Te Korowai analysis
The Oranga Tāne Māori research project explored the views of tāne Māori (Māori men) with a chronic disease or cancer, and their whānau (families), to discover how they experienced their health careExpand
Pacific fathers cultivating the future: the health of Pacific fathers and their influence upon and involvement with their children
TLDR
The prevalence of potential psychological disorder amongst a cohort of primarily Pacific fathers in New Zealand over their child’s first 6-years of life is investigated, and smoking status, marital status, employment status, and ethnicity were all significantly associated with the risk of developing symptomatic mental health disorder. Expand
Developing men's awareness of health issues.
CORREsPOnDEnCE TO: Lannes Johnson Clinical director, Harbour Health, PO Box 9, Greenhithe Auckland 0756, new Zealand ljohnson@ harbourhealth.org.nz Is there a need for New Zealand (NZ) to develop, orExpand
Factors associated with the use of health services by elderly men in Brazil: a cross-sectional study
TLDR
It was noted that unfavorable social issues affected the profile of health service utilization and that the health care of the elderly Brazilian man is centered on the disease and on curative and rehabilitative attention. Expand
Perceptions about men's health in a gender relational perspective, Brazil, 2014.
TLDR
The majority of the study population considers it has no health problem, especially men, and the main reason for failure to seek treatment is no access to services, although both men and women claim the healthcare services receive them adequately. Expand
Men's health and the health of the nation.
TLDR
With appropriate training and resources, primary health care is ideally placed to provide accessible, male-friendly services with lead to reduction in gender inequalities in health. Expand
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References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 153 REFERENCES
The future of men and their health
TLDR
It may seem incredible now, but up to just 25 years ago there was very limited research specifically targeted at women's health, and major studies are now generating increasing evidence on important differences between men and women, from the cellular to the societal level. Expand
To test or not to test?
TLDR
The sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of anti-GM1 testing by Covalink ELISA and by standard ELISA techniques are compared in a cohort of 76 patients with definite motor neuron or neuropathy syndromes, including 26 patients with multifocal motor neuropathy. Expand
Genders, sexes, and health: what are the connections--and why does it matter?
  • N. Krieger
  • Medicine
  • International journal of epidemiology
  • 2003
TLDR
12 case examples in which gender relations and sex-linked biology are singly, neither, or both relevant as independent or synergistic determinants of the selected outcomes are presented. Expand
Mortality and social class in Maori and nonMaori New Zealand men: changes between 1975-7 and 1985-7.
TLDR
Some progress has been achieved in reducing ethnic differences in mortality in New Zealand men, but substantial differences remain for diseases which are amenable to medical intervention, likely that these differences reflect poor access to culturally safe and appropriate health care in Maori people. Expand
Men making sense of their chest pain--niggles, doubts and denials.
TLDR
It is suggested that men’s self concept as ‘healthy’ may inhibit a speedy response to the signs and symptoms of acute coronary occlusion, increasing the risk of cardiac arrest without nearby life support. Expand
NCQA gender-specific standards: is there a place for men's health?
: The National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) has adopted 12 gender-specific standards for HMO accreditation. None of the 12 pertain to men's health. This article analyzes possibleExpand
Sex differences in illness beliefs and illness behavior in patients with suspected coronary artery disease.
TLDR
Men as well as women should be made more aware of their own risk of developing CAD and of the manifestation of CAD symptoms, and Physicians could be encouraged to ask patients more explicitly and thoroughly about their illness beliefs, to check their knowledge and inform them about CAD. Expand
Testosterone and Men's Health
TLDR
Overall, men with high testosterone would be healthier if they did not engage in health risk behavior and disease, and high testosterone increased the odds of some health problems but decreased the chances of others. Expand
Men's knowledge and health beliefs about testicular cancer and testicular self‐examination
TLDR
It is suggested that increased knowledge of TC and TSE could prove to be a motivating force that would stimulate a behavior change and the relationship of the variables, perceived susceptibility and perceived benefits, and the practice and nonpractice of TSE is supported. Expand
Gender differences in consulting a general practitioner for common symptoms of minor illness.
TLDR
Analysis of data from the West of Scotland Twenty-07 Study does not support the most widely suggested explanation for gender differences in consulting, that once symptoms are perceived, women have a higher propensity to consult a general practitioner with the symptom than men. Expand
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