Men's strategic preferences for femininity in female faces.

@article{Little2014MensSP,
  title={Men's strategic preferences for femininity in female faces.},
  author={Anthony C. Little and Benedict C. Jones and David R. Feinberg and David Ian Perrett},
  journal={British journal of psychology},
  year={2014},
  volume={105 3},
  pages={
          364-81
        }
}
Several evolutionarily relevant sources of individual differences in face preference have been documented for women. Here, we examine three such sources of individual variation in men's preference for female facial femininity: term of relationship, partnership status and self-perceived attractiveness. We show that men prefer more feminine female faces when rating for a short-term relationship and when they have a partner (Study 1). These variables were found to interact in a follow-up study… 

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