Memory for centrally attended changing objects in an incidental real-world change detection paradigm.

@article{Levin2002MemoryFC,
  title={Memory for centrally attended changing objects in an incidental real-world change detection paradigm.},
  author={D. Levin and D. Simons and B. Angelone and C. Chabris},
  journal={British journal of psychology},
  year={2002},
  volume={93 Pt 3},
  pages={
          289-302
        }
}
People often have difficulty detecting visual changes in scenes, a phenomenon referred to as 'change blindness'. Although change blindness is usually observed in pictures of objects that are not the focus of attention, it also occurs for attended objects in the real world. Here, we further explore the finding that many participants fail to detect the unexpected substitution of one conversation partner for another. We show that change blindness for a conversation partner occurs in a variety of… Expand
Evidence for Preserved Representations in Change Blindness
TLDR
In three experiments, it is shown that people often do have a representation of some aspects of the pre-change scene even when they fail to report the change, and they appear to "discover" this memory and can explicitly report details of a changed object in response to probing questions. Expand
Change blindness and visual memory: visual representations get rich and act poor.
TLDR
The results of the current experiments suggest that the capability to store visual information in memory is not reflected by the visual system's tendency to utilize these representations for purposes of detecting unexpected changes. Expand
Comparison and Representation Failures Both Cause Real-World Change Blindness
TLDR
Two real-world experiments using stimuli that changed on only one feature and tested recognition memory for both the changing feature and a non-changing feature suggest that change blindness can be caused by both a Failure to represent and a failure to compare information across views. Expand
A Comparison of Change Blindness and the Visual Perception of Museum Artefacts in Real-World and On-Screen Scenarios
Change blindness is a phenomenon of visual perception that occurs when a stimulus undergoes a change without this being noticed by its observer. Since it was first described in the 1990s, changeExpand
Large capacity storage of integrated objects before change blindness
TLDR
The findings indicate that change blindness involves overwriting of a large capacity representation by the post-change display, and suggests that the representation contains features in their 'bound' state. Expand
The Relationship between Change Detection and Recognition of Centrally Attended Objects in Motion Pictures
TLDR
Despite large differences in the detectability of changes across conditions, those observers who missed the change did not vary in their ability to recognize the changing object, and observers who detected the change were no more accurate in their recognition. Expand
Partial Representations of Scenes in Change Blindness: In the Eyes and in the Hands
TLDR
Two studies are showcased intending to test whether partial detection of changes may take place even when detection may not occur, and two commonly used change blindness techniques have similar effects, suggesting that it is not low-level perceptual features that are driving this sub-threshold processing. Expand
FROM CHANGE BLINDNESS TO CHOICE BLINDNESS
The phenomenon of change blindness has received a great deal of attention during the last decade, but very few experiments have examined the effects of the subjective importance of the visual stimuliExpand
A Comparison of Change Blindness in Real-World and On-Screen Viewing of Museum Artefacts
TLDR
It is found that change blindness does occur in a museum setting when similar ancient artefacts are viewed briefly one after another in both real-world and on-screen viewing conditions, and that change detection rates were influenced mainly by bottom-up factors, including the visible area and contrast of changes. Expand
Edit Blindness: The relationship between attention and global change blindness in dynamic scenes.
Although we experience the visual world as a continuous, richly detailed space we often fail to notice large and significant changes. Such change blindness has been demonstrated for local objectExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 27 REFERENCES
Evidence for Preserved Representations in Change Blindness
TLDR
In three experiments, it is shown that people often do have a representation of some aspects of the pre-change scene even when they fail to report the change, and they appear to "discover" this memory and can explicitly report details of a changed object in response to probing questions. Expand
Failure to detect changes to people during a real-world interaction
Recent research on change detection has documented surprising failures to detect visual changes occurring between views of a scene, suggesting the possibility that visual representations contain fewExpand
Failure to detect changes to attended objects in motion pictures
Our intuition that we richly represent the visual details of our environment is illusory. When viewing a scene, we seem to use detailed representations of object properties and interobject relationsExpand
False predictions about the detectability of visual changes: The role of beliefs about attention, memory, and the continuity of attended objects in causing change blindness blindness
TLDR
This work tests whether CBB is caused by a misestimation of the perceptual experience associated with visual changes and shows that it persists even when the pre- and postchange views are separated by long delays, and concludes that it is a robust phenomenon that cannot be accounted for by failure to understand the specific perceptual experienceassociated with a change. Expand
Change Blindness Blindness: The Metacognitive Error of Overestimating Change-detection Ability
Recent research has demonstrated that subjects fail to detect large between-view changes to natural and artificial scenes. Yet, most people (including psychologists) believe that they would detectExpand
Change blindness
TLDR
It is suggested that relatively little visual information is preserved from one view to the next, and a fundamental assumption that has underlain perception research for centuries is questioned: namely, that the authors need to store a detailed visual representation in the mind/brain from oneView to thenext. Expand
Current Approaches to Change Blindness
Across saccades, blinks, blank screens, movie cuts, and other interruptions, observers fail to detect substantial changes to the visual details of objects and scenes. This inability to spot changesExpand
TO SEE OR NOT TO SEE: The Need for Attention to Perceive Changes in Scenes
When looking at a scene, observers feel that they see its entire structure in great detail and can immediately notice any changes in it. However, when brief blank fields are placed betweenExpand
Is the Richness of Our Visual World an Illusion? Transsaccadic Memory for Complex Scenes
TLDR
The results reveal the poverty of transsaccadic memory for real-life complex scenes and are discussed with respect to Dennett's view that much less information is available in vision than the authors' subjective impression leads us to believe. Expand
Picture Changes During Blinks: Looking Without Seeing and Seeing Without Looking
Observers inspected normal, high quality colour displays of everyday visual scenes while their eye movements were recorded. A large display change occurred each time an eye blink occurred. DisplayExpand
...
1
2
3
...