Memory for Semantically Related and Unrelated Declarative Information: The Benefit of Sleep, the Cost of Wake

@article{Payne2012MemoryFS,
  title={Memory for Semantically Related and Unrelated Declarative Information: The Benefit of Sleep, the Cost of Wake},
  author={Jessica D. Payne and Matthew A Tucker and Jeffrey M. Ellenbogen and Erin J Wamsley and Matthew P. Walker and Daniel L. Schacter and Robert A Stickgold},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2012},
  volume={7}
}
  • Jessica D. Payne, Matthew A Tucker, +4 authors Robert A Stickgold
  • Published 2012
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • PLoS ONE
  • Numerous studies have examined sleep's influence on a range of hippocampus-dependent declarative memory tasks, from text learning to spatial navigation. In this study, we examined the impact of sleep, wake, and time-of-day influences on the processing of declarative information with strong semantic links (semantically related word pairs) and information requiring the formation of novel associations (unrelated word pairs). Participants encoded a set of related or unrelated word pairs at either… CONTINUE READING

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